DELWAQ

DELWAQ is the engine of the D-Water Quality and D-Ecology programmes of the Delft3D suite. It is based on a rich library from which relevant substances and processes can be selected to quickly put water and sediment quality models together.

The processes library covers many aspects of water quality and ecology, from basic tracers, dissolved oxygen, nutrients, organic matter, inorganic suspended matter, heavy metals, bacteria and organic micro-pollutants, to complex algae and macrophyte dynamics. High performance solvers enable the simulation of long periods, often required to capture the full cycles of the processes being modelled.

The finite volume approach underlying DELWAQ allows it to be coupled to both the structured grid hydrodynamics of the current Delft3D-FLOW engine and the upcoming D-Flow Flexible Mesh engine (1D-2D-3D) of the Delft3D Flexible Mesh Suite (or even other models such as TELEMAC).

'DELWAQ in open source' is our invitation to all leading experts to collaborate in further development and research in the field of water quality, ecology and morphology using Delft3D. Feel free to post your DELWAQ related questions or comments in this dedicated forum space. If you are new to DELWAQ, the tutorial (in the user manual) is a good place to start. A list of DELWAQ related publications is available here.

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D-Flow Flexible Mesh
DELWAQ

Cohesive sediments & muddy systems

 


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water quality calibration

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water quality calibration
Answer (Unmark)
10/13/16 5:58 PM
Hi there,

I've been getting mix review on how to calibrate water quality model. Some say to leave all parameters at boundary to be zero and some seem to say to inject some concentration at the boundary. Are these both options correct? or is one option more advisable than the other?

Wouldn't setting zero concentration at the boundary just causes specific parameter to decay until it reaches zero? or would it reach an equilibrium at some stage.

Thanks for helping :)
RE: water quality calibration
Answer (Unmark)
10/17/16 10:02 AMas a reply to Anonymous.
This very much depends on the problem you are trying to study:
- If there are no sources inside the model, the exchange over the boundary will cause it to disappear from the model in the long run
- For substances like salinity, a useful boundary condition depends on whether your model represents a marine environment or a freshwater environment
- etc.

Could you describe the modelling problem you are studying? Also, the term calibration is usually used for finding the right values for process parameters and the like, whereas from your description I get the impression that you are looking for the way to set up your model, based on - probably - a small amount of field data only.